Phone

+123-456-7890

Email

[email protected]

Opening Hours

Mon - Fri: 7AM - 7PM

Showing: 1 - 4 of 4 RESULTS
kbanqcmu

Mexico and U.S. Reiterate Commitment to Cooperate Against Drug Cartels

first_imgMexico and the U.S. have worked together closely in recent years to improve the fight against drug trafficking by transnational criminal organizations, which operate in both countries. Former presidents George W. Bush (U.S.) and Felipe Calderón (Mexico) signed the Merida Initiative – a binational project aimed at fighting organized crime and associated violence while furthering respect for human rights and the rule of law – in October 2007. U.S. assistance will help Mexico improve security, “especially this clear challenge Mexico has to continue fighting organized crime,” Peña Nieto said. The cocaine was discovered in November hidden inside 3,522 boxes of salt lamps that were part of a trailer-truck’s load. The truck was hauling its cargo, worth more than $15 million, from the Cochabamba region, east of La Paz. Bolivian law enforcement officials suspect the cocaine belonged to a Mexican drug cartel and that it was headed to the United States. Mexico and the U.S. have worked together closely in recent years to improve the fight against drug trafficking by transnational criminal organizations, which operate in both countries. Former presidents George W. Bush (U.S.) and Felipe Calderón (Mexico) signed the Merida Initiative – a binational project aimed at fighting organized crime and associated violence while furthering respect for human rights and the rule of law – in October 2007. Police arrested two men, whom they have not publicly identified. In the country’s largest cocaine seizure of 2014, Bolivian Counter-Narcotics police officers incinerated 412 kilograms of cocaine seized from an organized crime group, Deputy Minister of Social Defense Felipe Cáceres said on January 5. Bolivia’s Counter-Narcotics Police destroy large amount of cocaine Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto and U.S. President Barack Obama have reiterated their commitment to work cooperatively to fight Mexican drug cartels. “Our commitment is to be a friend and supporter of Mexico in its efforts to eliminate the scourge of violence and the drug cartels that are responsible for so much tragedy inside of Mexico,” Obama said. By Dialogo January 08, 2015 “Our commitment is to be a friend and supporter of Mexico in its efforts to eliminate the scourge of violence and the drug cartels that are responsible for so much tragedy inside of Mexico,” Obama said. In the country’s largest cocaine seizure of 2014, Bolivian Counter-Narcotics police officers incinerated 412 kilograms of cocaine seized from an organized crime group, Deputy Minister of Social Defense Felipe Cáceres said on January 5. The leaders met January 6 at the White House in the U.S. capital of Washington, D.C., where Obama said the U.S. will continue to work with Mexico to fight narco-trafficking. U.S. assistance will help Mexico improve security, “especially this clear challenge Mexico has to continue fighting organized crime,” Peña Nieto said. Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto and U.S. President Barack Obama have reiterated their commitment to work cooperatively to fight Mexican drug cartels. Bolivia’s Counter-Narcotics Police destroy large amount of cocaine The leaders met January 6 at the White House in the U.S. capital of Washington, D.C., where Obama said the U.S. will continue to work with Mexico to fight narco-trafficking. The cocaine was discovered in November hidden inside 3,522 boxes of salt lamps that were part of a trailer-truck’s load. The truck was hauling its cargo, worth more than $15 million, from the Cochabamba region, east of La Paz. Bolivian law enforcement officials suspect the cocaine belonged to a Mexican drug cartel and that it was headed to the United States. Police arrested two men, whom they have not publicly identified. How do you put an end to the Colombian guerrillas by granting them pardons and putting them to work in factories that will open? Peace will never coexist with hunger.last_img read more

jvneqbzx

Chilean Navy Officer Stands Out Among the First Generation of Female Lieutenants

first_imgBy Guillermo Saavedra / Diálogo April 16, 2020 Since late 2019, the Chilean Navy has its first generation of female lieutenants. Twenty-four women from all over the country rose to this rank, marking a milestone for the naval institution, which seeks to increase female participation in its units.Among these women, one officer stands out for her participation in the search for a Chilean Air Force (FACh, in Spanish) aircraft that crashed into the sea on its way to Antarctica in December: Lieutenant Greassy Brash. Deployed as the only female officer on the multipurpose ship LSDH-91 Sargento Aldea, a transport logistics vessel, Lt. Brash served as flight deck officer for the two Bolkow helicopters on board.It was the first time that Sargento Aldea was taking part in the Chilean Navy’s Antarctic Naval Campaign, setting sail in mid-November to transport equipment and supplies. However, as the crew crossed the Drake Passage, they heard that the FACh’s C-130 Hercules had gone missing, so they used their resources to find the military aircraft, which carried 38 people on board.Chilean Navy Lieutenant Greassy Brash (center) served as flight deck officer aboard the multipurpose ship LSDH-91 Sargento Aldea and took part in search operations for the Chilean Air Force C-130 aircraft that crashed on its way to Antarctica in December. (Photo: Chilean Navy)“As flight deck officer during the search mission to find the C-130’s remains, I was in charge of all air operations, including helicopter takeoff and landing on the ship, as well as the designation of personnel on deck and at sea to search for the remains, which were brought on board for their classification,” Lt. Brash said.The Drake Passage, a maritime zone that separates Antarctica from the southernmost part of South America, is known for being one of the most dangerous areas in the world to operate in, both by air and by sea, due to its harsh weather conditions.“There’s an interesting process on the flight deck, where there are several factors to consider: wind, and load weight to reduce the risk for the helicopter,” said Chilean Navy Captain Roberto Fonseca, commander of the Sargento Aldea, about Lt. Brash’s role. “Although our helicopter pilots are professionals, the link between the ship and air element is managed by the flight deck officer. That’s where Lt. Brash’s leadership stood out. Her hallmark is discipline and following protocols; she is a leader and a guide.”Raised in Talcahuano, a port town in the south of Chile, Lt. Brash never imagined she would pursue a career in the Navy until 2007, when the Naval Academy opened the doors of its officer training courses to women. “I wanted to know what it was about, so I applied and got in with other women,” said the lieutenant. “The first year was tough, not only because we were the first generation, but also because the men in the course had to assimilate this change.”These obstacles didn’t stop her. She chose the Supply officer program, with a specialization in finance and management. And a few years following her admission, “she stood out among all the country’s officers in her specialty, with a special recognition by the institution for her strong performance, faultless behavior, and ability in sports,” the Army said in a press release.Lt. Brash takes pride in the responsibilities that come with her decision to be part of the first generation of naval women in Chile. “We are defining patterns and behavior, and everything we do or stop doing can either create or destroy expectations regarding how women can advance in the Navy. At this moment, we are the basis for the new generations to come, and we are leading the way in a man’s world.”last_img read more

hqxekrnk

WHO opens door to change for global public health alerts

first_imgTopics : The WHO said Thursday it was setting up a committee to consider changing the rules on declaring an international health emergency, following criticism of its COVID-19 pandemic response. The World Health Organization declared a public health emergency of international concern (PHEIC) over the new coronavirus on January 30 — at which time the respiratory disease had infected fewer than 100 people outside China, and claimed no lives beyond its borders.But under the current International Health Regulations (IHR) governing preparedness and response for health emergencies, there are no lower, intermediate levels of alarm beneath a full PHEIC, either on a global or regional scale. The WHO has faced accusations — notably from Washington — of mishandling the pandemic, and waiting too long to sound the alarm.WHO experts had met on January 22 and 23, but at that point did not conclude that the outbreak merited the high state of alert of a full PHEIC.WHO director-general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus told a virtual press conference on Thursday that the COVID-19 pandemic had been an “acid test” for countries as well as for the IHR.Now the WHO will set up a review committee into the global regulations to see whether any changes should be made, Tedros said.center_img He added that even before the coronavirus pandemic, emergencies such as the Ebola outbreak in the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo had exposed flaws in the IHR.Such emergencies showed that “some elements of the IHR may need review — including the binary nature of the [alert] mechanism,” Tedros said.Several countries have also called for a more nuanced system, for example with three levels of alert, or regional alarms.The committee will be comprised of independent experts.Tedros hopes the committee will present a progress report to the World Health Assembly — the WHO’s decision-making body, made up of member states — in November, and a full report to the assembly in May.”WHO is committed to ending the pandemic, and to working with all countries to learn from it, and to ensure that together we build the healthier, safer, fairer world that we want,” he said.The committee is separate from the Independent Panel for Pandemic Preparedness and Response, set up to evaluate the global response to the COVID-19 pandemic.The IPPR is being headed by former New Zealand prime minister Helen Clark and former Liberian president Ellen Johnson Sirleaf.last_img read more

sboluujj

Quigley makes history

first_img Press Association Jason Quigley became the first Irish boxer in history to reach a World Championship final on Friday with victory over Russia’s Artem Chebotarev in Almaty. The Donegal middleweight will fight Kazakhstan’s Zhanibek Alimkhanuly for the title on Saturday after earning a unanimous decision with a display of slick counter-punching. Quigley said: “I kept my composure and kept on him and picked him off with better shots. I’m not going to let anybody get in my way now. center_img “We went through the tactics last night. We knew he was going to come at me so the aim was to pick him off as he comes. I knew I had the skill and speed to beat him.” Quigley, who won the European title in June, is the only Irish or British fighter to make the finals after last-four defeats for Joe Ward and Andrew Selby on Friday. Ward was outclassed in his light-heavyweight semi-final by Cuba’s defending champion Julio De La Cruz, who won every round on all three of the judges’ scorecards. And there was heartbreak for Welshman Selby, who had to settle for a bronze medal after dropping a tight split decision to Uzbekistan’s Jasurbek Latipov in their flyweight semi-final. Earlier, Liverpool middleweight Antony Fowler was forced to withdraw from his semi-final against Kazakhstan’s Zhanibek Alimkhanuly due to a hand injury. Fowler had been due to take on the home favourite on Friday afternoon but injured his hand during his last-eight win over Stefan Haertel. Fowler, who only recently returned from a different injury to the same hand, was pulled out after extensive discussions between GB coaches and the medical team, and will have to settle for a bronze medal. Fowler said: “I am absolutely gutted I cannot compete today as I have been boxing really well and feel I could go all the way, however the coaches and medical team have told me it is not safe to continue.” last_img read more