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Watching TV for too long may double blood clot risk

first_imgDo you have the habit of sitting glued to the idiot box everyday? Beware, you may be at nearly twice the risk of developing blood clots, researchers warn. The findings showed that risk of blood clots in the veins of the legs, arms, pelvis and lungs known as venous thromboembolism or VTE increases with the amount of time spent watching television even if people get the recommended amount of physical activity. “Watching TV itself isn’t likely bad, but we tend to snack and sit still for prolonged periods while watching,” said Mary Cushman, Professor at the University of Vermont in Burlington.For the study, the team examined 15,158 middle-aged (45-64 years) participants. Those who watched TV “very often” were at 1.7 times higher risk of developing blood clots compared with those who watch TV “never or seldom”.The people, who met recommended guidelines for physical activity and reported watching TV “very often”, had 1.8 times higher risk compared to those who reported watching TV “never or seldom”.”Think about how you can make the best use of your time to live a fuller and healthier life. You could put a treadmill or stationary bike in front of your TV and move while watching,” Cushman said. The results were presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2017 in California. Previous studies have associated prolonged TV viewing with heart disease involving blocked arteries.Although venous thromboembolism is more common in people 60 and older, it can occur at any age.Besides avoiding prolonged TV watching, one can also lower the risk of venous thromboembolism by maintaining a healthy weight and staying physically active, the researchers suggested.But that’s not the end of the problems. There are various other issues that you will keep on encountering later in life. Sitting for long hours in front of television not only develop blood clots but also increases the risk of cancer, heart diseases and diabetes. Researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health, took into account published scientific studies dating from 1970 all the way to 2011 and found that collectively, the data from those studies reveal a clear correlation between more than two hours of TV viewing time and risk factors for type 2 diabetes, as well as cardiovascular disease. The risk of heart disease increased by 15 percent. For diabetes, the risk increased by 20 percent for people that watched TV more than two hours a day.Yet another study published in the Journal of Applied Physiology in 2011 revealed that when people lower their activity from over 10,000 steps a day to less than 5,000 steps a day, physical changes in the body directly increase that person’s risk to death due to various diseases.agencieslast_img read more

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Like old photos memories fade over time

first_imgLike old photographs, the visual quality of our memories declines over time, according to a study. When people remember the past, they remember it with varying degrees of clarity. Sometimes people remember lots of details about an event, as if they are reliving the moment as it happened, said Maureen Ritchey, an assistant professor at Boston College in the US. Other times, it seems like the memory has faded, and the details are fuzzy, according to the study published in the journal Psychological Science. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfPrevious research has shown that emotionally significant events – like a car accident – are remembered more vividly than everyday events. “We wanted to know whether this feeling of memory vividness is related to not just what is remembered, but how it is remembered – the visual quality of the memory,” Ritchey said in a statement. She said people reported changes to their memories akin to using a filter to edit a picture. “A simple analogy is what happens when you post a photo on Instagram. You are cued to apply a filter that changes the brightness or colour saturation of the image,” Ritchey said. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveIn three experiments, participants studied emotionally negative and neutral images that varied in visual quality – luminance and colour saturation. They then reconstructed the visual qualities of each image in a subsequent test. The findings revealed that memories were recollected as less visually vibrant than they were encoded, demonstrating a novel memory-fading effect, the researchers said. Negative emotions subjects experienced when viewing the images increased the likelihood that images would be accurately remembered but did not influence memory fading. In addition, subjective ratings of memory vividness were lower for less accurate memories and for memories that had visually faded, the team found. These findings provide evidence that the vibrancy of low-level details – such as colours and shapes associated with an event – fade in memory while the gist of the experience is retained. People may remember going to a music festival and watching their favourite band, but the intensity of that sensory experience, including the bright stage lights and strength of the bass, will slowly fade. “We found that memories seem to literally fade: people consistently remembered visual scenes as being less vibrant than they were originally experienced,” said post-doctoral researcher Rose Cooper. “We had expected that memories would get less accurate after a delay, but we did not expect that there would be this qualitative shift in the way that they were remembered,” Cooper said. The fading effect happened less for memories that were rated as subjectively stronger. “We were also surprised to find that emotional memories did not influence the amount of fading, only the likelihood with which people remembered the images at all,” she added.last_img read more